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yim11
06-11-2008, 10:48 PM
I was wondering if anyone has ever tried splitting off the intake and outflow of a single canister filter to multiple tanks? The idea crossed my mind the other day and my first thought was that it might be difficult to get the same intake/outflow rates to all tanks. Thought I would check here to see if anyone has ever tried this.

Thanks!
-jim

dwilder
06-14-2008, 06:43 PM
one problem with using one filter for multiple tanks is if you have a problem in one tank you have alot of cross contamination and more likely that other fish get sick rather than just one tank of sick fish

Ed13
06-14-2008, 06:55 PM
It can be done without physical damage to the filter, but in my opinion it's only worth a try for small tanks containing fish that don't really require much in terms of flow or filtration, not really for discus. It probably won't really handle mechanical filtration though, not to mention the risk of cross contamination already mention. I'm afraid the best rout is to purchase a second filter.

yim11
06-14-2008, 09:57 PM
Thanks for the responses. In this case it would be for 3 10gs - 2 plant tanks, 1 QT. Each has their own HOB filter now but I thought a single canister for all 3 would be more efficient and use less electricity.

Ed13
06-14-2008, 10:35 PM
Thanks for the responses. In this case it would be for 3 10gs - 2 plant tanks, 1 QT. Each has their own HOB filter now but I thought a single canister for all 3 would be more efficient and use less electricity.
You would not want the QT in the system, but a med to large canister will handle two planted 10g. You'll need to put the intake line in one and the output line in the other. If they are empty drill them, install bulkheads and connect them via tubing or PVC pipes. If they are filled you'll need to put a U tube between them(the one used in overflow boxes is perfect, preferrably of clear Acrylic(my LFS sells them at @$12), but a PVC one DIY will do it. This way it's cheap, easy, and the fish will swim between tanks. The downsides are its ugly, if air gets in the tube(unlikely if you are carefull) you'll damage the filter and cause a flood and pests and algae will make their way two both tanks

yim11
06-15-2008, 01:36 AM
Thanks Ed13, but the tanks are on a rack, one above another.

It makes sense to have the QT off a shared filter system for obvious reasons. One thought I had was the QT tank might benefit from the oxygenated water produced by the plant tanks, also might help to keep NO3 in balance for all tanks. But either way - always better safe than sorry.

Any thoughts on splitting the main canister inputs/outflows for a rack design? I figure there will be some reduction in flow as the hoses go up the rack, but is it enough to worry about? Even if I only used this for 2 tanks I think it would really help on maintenance and electricity.

Thanks
-jim

honeywell7000
07-02-2008, 04:13 PM
i'm running a mag 350 between 2 tanks (side by side) with an overflow inbetween. seems to work fine.... pros and cons to it as you can tell. since they are on a rack, your overflow would be much easier.

kyle

Fons_van_der_Hart
07-03-2008, 05:02 AM
This will never work.

When having multiple tanks on one cannister you need to have them all on one level.
No difference in heights or so otherwise the lowest tank will overflow.
A QT tank is never connected with one of your other tanks, in fact if you want to have a QT tank the right way it's even in another room.

The only way you can have this system to work is to have overflows on the first tanks, the intake of the cannister on the lowest tank and the outlet on the top tank.