Cafepress Store     NADA

Page 26 of 26 FirstFirst ... 16242526
Results 376 to 389 of 389

Thread: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

  1. #376
    Silver Member Luke in Phoenix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    198
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Luke

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    So far my nitrates stay between 1 - 5 regardless of how many water changes I do. Although I do only have one basket, it is a fairly large basket at 6 by 6 & half by 9 1/2 inches. Area wise, that is worth about 5.7 baskets sized 4 X4 inches. I also have an algae scrubber which helps with the nitrate but I think the BCB is the better method. I'm going to build a huge sump for my next aquarium with the equivalent of around 50 baskets or more and a small algae scrubber. I'm hoping for incredible results never seen before with infrequent water changes. I'm a little crazy but want to test the limits.

  2. #377
    Silver Member Luke in Phoenix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    198
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Luke

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    To further clarify my reasoning and quest for the ultimate aquarium setup:

    We've found a way (and algae scrubber another way) to keep nitrates, phosphates (plus anything else? )at levels below 5ppm. Often times close to 0. If these items stay below 5ppm with zero water changes, what is causing the need for water changes?
    I know my fish still need water changes although less often (because I've pushed the limits) but why is my question. Hypothetically, what is the next thing that we need to test for in order to know when to do a water change?

    I have 2 UV sterilizers (true large "sterilizers") on my tank so I doubt it's anything bacterial in the water...

  3. #378
    Registered Member zhuls1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    139
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Zac

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    I'm going to build a huge sump for my next aquarium with the equivalent of around 50 baskets or more and a small algae scrubber.
    That is a whole lot of BCB's, how big of an aquarium are you thinking about getting? With that many baskets you must be planning on a lot more discus. Personally, with that many baskets I wouldn't bother with an algae scrubber. their are many reasons as to why we change the water. one reason is to remove toxins, or undesirable chemicals. This includes Nitrates, phosphates, dissolved organics, heavy metals, proteins from the water column etc. The BCB takes care of both nitrates and phosphates. If you want the ultimate filtration system, you will want something to remove disolved organcis, proteins and heavy metals. Fortunately, proteins have a tendency to float so using a filter sock or filter floss to polish the water after the overflow will suffice for its removal. As for dissolved organics and heavy metals, carbon should be able to remove it. if you are planning on going little to no waterchanges, I think you should definitely chuck some carbon into the mix. Another reason we do waterchanges is to keep parameters stable. Typically, the nitrifying bacteria makes the water more acidic, so the longer you go without a waterchange, the lower you PH would get. I don't know what effect the BCB's have on PH but I dont think it alters it as much as typical nitrifying bacteria. I would suggest doing a waterchange whenever you can measure a change in PH. Some good quality carbons and other chemical filter medias can help to maintain a stable PH. If you really wanted too you could even go to the extent of using a reactor to maintain a stable PH to really push the limits of no water changes, but I don't think its necessary as you would have to adjust it precisely to your tank. A chemical media such as carbon IMO is a much better option for maintaining a stable PH. Finally, we do waterchanges to add minerals back to the water column. This will really depend on your setup, plants obtain a considerable portion of their minerals through the water. Where as fish, for the most part, get their minerals from their food. if you only have fish and no plants, adding minerals to the tank is less important as fish do not use a lot of minerals from the water column itself. A final reason as to why we do waterchanges, is to remove organics and unwanted organisms from the aquarium. This includes, decaying food, parasites, dying plants etc. another way we can remove organics from the watercolumn with out doing waterchanges is by doing frequent filter sock replacement. Also, I suggest having a particularly high flow rate to prevent dead spots where debris will settle. With good flow within your aqaurium, you can prevent nearly all debris from settling at the bottom of the tank in the first place. Another method of removing proteins and organics from the water column is with a protein skimmer. I have heard of a few people who used protein skimmers on freshwater aquariums with good results. How they do it is by attaching a large air pump to the protein skimmer. This allows it to function in freshwater. Albeit, It is still not as efficient as it would be in saltwater, it does work. Personally, I would look at using a protein skimmer instead of an algae scrubber. Or if you really wanted to you could use both. The benefit of a protein skimmer is it removes waste before it gets a chance to break down into nitrates and phosphates to begin with.

  4. #379
    Registered Member zhuls1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    139
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Zac

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Also, another filtration method I am considering experimenting with is micro electrolysis. Could also be another stage for your "Ultimate filtration system". The company Ocean free makes an micro electrolysis system they call the OF Hydra. and the external version OF Hydra stream. this will help considerably with dissolved organics. I would use this as your last stage of filtration.

  5. #380
    Registered Member Salty Sphynx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    27th Parallel
    Posts
    40
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Heather

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Quote Originally Posted by zhuls1 View Post
    I'm going to build a huge sump for my next aquarium with the equivalent of around 50 baskets or more and a small algae scrubber.
    That is a whole lot of BCB's, how big of an aquarium are you thinking about getting? With that many baskets you must be planning on a lot more discus. Personally, with that many baskets I wouldn't bother with an algae scrubber. their are many reasons as to why we change the water. one reason is to remove toxins, or undesirable chemicals. This includes Nitrates, phosphates, dissolved organics, heavy metals, proteins from the water column etc. The BCB takes care of both nitrates and phosphates. If you want the ultimate filtration system, you will want something to remove disolved organcis, proteins and heavy metals. Fortunately, proteins have a tendency to float so using a filter sock or filter floss to polish the water after the overflow will suffice for its removal. As for dissolved organics and heavy metals, carbon should be able to remove it. if you are planning on going little to no waterchanges, I think you should definitely chuck some carbon into the mix. Another reason we do waterchanges is to keep parameters stable. Typically, the nitrifying bacteria makes the water more acidic, so the longer you go without a waterchange, the lower you PH would get. I don't know what effect the BCB's have on PH but I dont think it alters it as much as typical nitrifying bacteria. I would suggest doing a waterchange whenever you can measure a change in PH. Some good quality carbons and other chemical filter medias can help to maintain a stable PH. If you really wanted too you could even go to the extent of using a reactor to maintain a stable PH to really push the limits of no water changes, but I don't think its necessary as you would have to adjust it precisely to your tank. A chemical media such as carbon IMO is a much better option for maintaining a stable PH. Finally, we do waterchanges to add minerals back to the water column. This will really depend on your setup, plants obtain a considerable portion of their minerals through the water. Where as fish, for the most part, get their minerals from their food. if you only have fish and no plants, adding minerals to the tank is less important as fish do not use a lot of minerals from the water column itself. A final reason as to why we do waterchanges, is to remove organics and unwanted organisms from the aquarium. This includes, decaying food, parasites, dying plants etc. another way we can remove organics from the watercolumn with out doing waterchanges is by doing frequent filter sock replacement. Also, I suggest having a particularly high flow rate to prevent dead spots where debris will settle. With good flow within your aqaurium, you can prevent nearly all debris from settling at the bottom of the tank in the first place. Another method of removing proteins and organics from the water column is with a protein skimmer. I have heard of a few people who used protein skimmers on freshwater aquariums with good results. How they do it is by attaching a large air pump to the protein skimmer. This allows it to function in freshwater. Albeit, It is still not as efficient as it would be in saltwater, it does work. Personally, I would look at using a protein skimmer instead of an algae scrubber. Or if you really wanted to you could use both. The benefit of a protein skimmer is it removes waste before it gets a chance to break down into nitrates and phosphates to begin with.
    Excellent points. Agree with everything.

    Only thing I would add (at the risk of belaboring the point) is the importance of utilizing a plenum. Based on my own recent experience, I am convinced that in conjunction with the BCBs, the plenum is a significant contributing factor in maintaining the zero numbers on my ammonia, NO2/NO3.

    These were my readings today:

    Screen Shot 2018-04-17 at 8.36.23 PM.jpg
    Every Day is a Bonus!

  6. #381
    Registered Member zhuls1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    139
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Zac

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Hey Salty, I agree a plenum is very useful for nitrogen removal. I switched from BB to plenum with kitty litter in my discus tank as a bit of an experiment, and whilst my ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were all 0 on my api test kit, I did notice small pellets and beefheart mix got lost in my substrate so my discus couldn't find it. Because of this I have switched back to Bare Bottom, but I think I will put some sand in the aquarium for aesthetics as food shouldn't get lost in sand.

  7. #382
    Registered Member Salty Sphynx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    27th Parallel
    Posts
    40
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Heather

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Quote Originally Posted by zhuls1 View Post
    Hey Salty, I agree a plenum is very useful for nitrogen removal. I switched from BB to plenum with kitty litter in my discus tank as a bit of an experiment, and whilst my ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were all 0 on my api test kit, I did notice small pellets and beefheart mix got lost in my substrate so my discus couldn't find it. Because of this I have switched back to Bare Bottom, but I think I will put some sand in the aquarium for aesthetics as food shouldn't get lost in sand.
    Yes, it is a bit of a chore to ensure there's sufficient water movement to help with keeping the detritus up towards the surface... I try to do frequent light raking in an attempt to keep that at bay. Is definitely not maintenance free, but I insisted on sand this time, lol.
    Every Day is a Bonus!

  8. #383
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    167
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Sayid

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Quote Originally Posted by zhuls1 View Post
    I'm going to build a huge sump for my next aquarium with the equivalent of around 50 baskets or more and a small algae scrubber.
    That is a whole lot of BCB's, how big of an aquarium are you thinking about getting? With that many baskets you must be planning on a lot more discus. Personally, with that many baskets I wouldn't bother with an algae scrubber. their are many reasons as to why we change the water. one reason is to remove toxins, or undesirable chemicals. This includes Nitrates, phosphates, dissolved organics, heavy metals, proteins from the water column etc. The BCB takes care of both nitrates and phosphates. If you want the ultimate filtration system, you will want something to remove disolved organcis, proteins and heavy metals. Fortunately, proteins have a tendency to float so using a filter sock or filter floss to polish the water after the overflow will suffice for its removal. As for dissolved organics and heavy metals, carbon should be able to remove it. if you are planning on going little to no waterchanges, I think you should definitely chuck some carbon into the mix. Another reason we do waterchanges is to keep parameters stable. Typically, the nitrifying bacteria makes the water more acidic, so the longer you go without a waterchange, the lower you PH would get. I don't know what effect the BCB's have on PH but I dont think it alters it as much as typical nitrifying bacteria. I would suggest doing a waterchange whenever you can measure a change in PH. Some good quality carbons and other chemical filter medias can help to maintain a stable PH. If you really wanted too you could even go to the extent of using a reactor to maintain a stable PH to really push the limits of no water changes, but I don't think its necessary as you would have to adjust it precisely to your tank. A chemical media such as carbon IMO is a much better option for maintaining a stable PH. Finally, we do waterchanges to add minerals back to the water column. This will really depend on your setup, plants obtain a considerable portion of their minerals through the water. Where as fish, for the most part, get their minerals from their food. if you only have fish and no plants, adding minerals to the tank is less important as fish do not use a lot of minerals from the water column itself. A final reason as to why we do waterchanges, is to remove organics and unwanted organisms from the aquarium. This includes, decaying food, parasites, dying plants etc. another way we can remove organics from the watercolumn with out doing waterchanges is by doing frequent filter sock replacement. Also, I suggest having a particularly high flow rate to prevent dead spots where debris will settle. With good flow within your aqaurium, you can prevent nearly all debris from settling at the bottom of the tank in the first place. Another method of removing proteins and organics from the water column is with a protein skimmer. I have heard of a few people who used protein skimmers on freshwater aquariums with good results. How they do it is by attaching a large air pump to the protein skimmer. This allows it to function in freshwater. Albeit, It is still not as efficient as it would be in saltwater, it does work. Personally, I would look at using a protein skimmer instead of an algae scrubber. Or if you really wanted to you could use both. The benefit of a protein skimmer is it removes waste before it gets a chance to break down into nitrates and phosphates to begin with.
    Very comprehensive ,I agree with every point and it make sense.

  9. #384
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    167
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Sayid

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    I have used stainless steel basket instead of plastic in two of my systems ,my question is does stainless steel interfere with the attraction of ammonia towards kitty litter / laterite or not ??
    Any clarification would be appreciated .

  10. #385
    Registered Member farebox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    737
    iTrader
    2 (100%)
    Real Name
    Roland E. Wilson

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    This morning had a thought that since I'm going to be 69 yrs. old in a few weeks and been keeping freshwater tanks since I were 21 yrs. old, with this DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" for my 125 gallon discus tank I've reached an new level in the hobby and will continue with I have so far established. No more changes to the tank, bare bottom with potted plants will stay as is. I have a very well healthy tank with 9 adult discus. I wish everyone total success with ever they're doing with their "Anoxic Filtration System". Always love to hear about what's going on with your discus tanks. Keep the thread going....

  11. #386
    Registered Member Salty Sphynx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    27th Parallel
    Posts
    40
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Heather

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Quote Originally Posted by sayid View Post
    I have used stainless steel basket instead of plastic in two of my systems ,my question is does stainless steel interfere with the attraction of ammonia towards kitty litter / laterite or not ??
    Any clarification would be appreciated .
    Dr Novak says the stainless will work.
    Every Day is a Bonus!

  12. #387
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    167
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Sayid

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Salty Sphynx View Post
    Dr Novak says the stainless will work.
    Thanks salty for the quick reply ,was Dr Novak reply to your question ? or was it a statement on YouTube ?
    In any case ,it is good to know that i don't need to change the basket ,thanks again.

  13. #388
    Registered Member Salty Sphynx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    27th Parallel
    Posts
    40
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Heather

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Quote Originally Posted by sayid View Post
    Thanks salty for the quick reply ,was Dr Novak reply to your question ? or was it a statement on YouTube ?
    In any case ,it is good to know that i don't need to change the basket ,thanks again.
    Both

    He replied to my question in the comment section of his most recent anoxic filter update video on his channel.
    Every Day is a Bonus!

  14. #389
    Registered Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    167
    iTrader
    0
    Real Name
    Sayid

    Default Re: DIY "Anoxic Filtration System" eliminates nitrates? Anyone tried this?

    Thanks salty.

Page 26 of 26 FirstFirst ... 16242526

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Cafepress             AquaticSuppliers.com