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Thread: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

  1. #31
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    Default Re:Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Luca,

    Yes, aging the water will off-gas the CO2 and Chlorine, raising the pH. Adding CO2 will lower the pH, however, that's not such a bad thing and with proper buffering can be a very effective and cheap way of maintaining a low pH.

    I usually do 50% WC every three days in my tank.

    Best,
    Phil

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    Default Re:Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Just to add a little more to the D.I.Y. systems, here's a few pics of my filter for my 55 gal planted tank. It was made out of an old 25 gal tank. I used thick and high-quality Spanish wall-tiles to separate the chambers. They have a quite decent heat-retention capacity and with the heater in the filter tank it's more economical. A 200W Ebo-Jager turned on to 3 keeps the tank at 30C during the day and 28C at night. The rest you can figure out, no rocket science involved.

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    Default Pic.2.

    Coming in from the tank. Note the number of air bubbles. Not bad for filter aeration.

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    Default Pic.3.

    Well, you don't see too many of them, but there are plenty anyway...
    This picture shows the "rainmaker" which has been improved by a plexi sheet with lots of holes in it to spread the water evenly over the sponge's surface.

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    Default Re:Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    And the two pumps. The smaller pump, sitting on top of the ceramic rings drives the "rainmaker".
    The bigger one pumps the water back up into the tank.
    With the water level set a bit higher in the filter, I now have a bag of peat doing its business above the pumps and the sponge.

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    Default Re:Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Excellant thinking; good design.
    Nice to see someone doing their own building.

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    Default Re:Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    this question is for Phil Edwards ...about his sump filter.. but if anyone else can help me with it then feel free..

    where and what are you using for mechanical filtration in your system?

    i was wondering this b/c im just getting ready to set up my 90g as a planted discus setup......and it already has the overflow built it. your system looks good ...it just i was wondering how to ensure mechanical filtering without off-gassing more co2 than you already are .


    thanks in advance for the help

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Hi vrldiscus,
    I have a 125 gallon with 2 built-in over-flows too, I really don't get that much CO2 off gassing because of them. A more important thing to do is to make sure your drain lines enter under the water surface of your sump, this is where the majority of CO2 loss takes place IME, and also make sure your returns are under the aquarium's water surface too, but also make sure that you have some water surface movement (surface should move but not ripple) Using only a Sweetwater diffuser in front of my pump intake I get 20-25 ppm CO2 without using an excess amount CO2 from my cylinder, a 10# tank lasts me about 4 months. But I use a solenoid to shut off the CO2 when the lights are out.

    hth,
    Larry

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    hi,
    I cant see any pics here anyone else

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    I don't have any pics either.
    ~Lovin' the King in TX~

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Could we get this thread deleted please? I'll have an updated one in a couple months when the new tank's set up.

    Cheers,
    Phil
    I'm not sure what Im looking at, but its huge and I think its going to be cool!

    Aquatic Gardeners Association
    www.aquatic-gardeners.org

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Hi Phil
    I am new to "Discus" and "SimplyDiscus".
    I am planning a return back into the aquarium hobby after being
    tank less for almost 2 decades.
    I am in the process of designing a 200 gallon Perfecto Predrilled
    "Discus Only" planted show tank and I am researching filtration.
    I think I have eliminated canister filters as they limit my options
    (i.e. heaters, uv, nitrate filter in the sump) and the possibility of
    the bacteria colony becoming anaerobic due to oxygen deprivation
    in the case of a power failure which is common in this area.
    What are your thoughts?
    I have been looking at the Lifereef LF2 Side by Side Wet/Dry trickle
    filter, but as I continue my research it appears that a good deal of
    opinion and consensus is that the biological filter should be completely
    submerged and under water. In the Lifereef the tower sits above what appears to be a very small section that could house completely submerged
    biological filter material (Matala or pumice).
    What are your thoughts?
    I came upon a "thread" about Sump Media from colinlp on SimplyDiscus and a sump that he had bought that had a thumbnail picture attached.
    It looked functional.
    I had previously read a thread by Chad Hughes who was designing a "Discus Room" in his garage. It was a fascinating thread of technology and efficiency,
    with lots of good information.
    A light went off in my head!
    I then found your thread "Filtration System for a Planted Aquarium".
    Another light went off in my head!
    Why not build the "Perfect Filtration System" like the experienced and knowlegeable "Discus" lovers like yourself have designed and built.
    Why reinvent the wheel. Utilize the experience of seasoned, knowledgeable pros like yourself.
    As a newly addicted "Discus Lover" I find myself envious of all the knowledge and experience that all you experienced "Discus Keepers" have, and thanks to forums like "SimplyDiscus" we have the opportunity to learn from all the seasoned "Discus Pros" like yourself.
    Can you please post pictures and design plans of your filtration system and explain for the newly addicted "Discus Lovers" of the world like myself what is accomplised in each section/compartment.
    Thanks
    Steve

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    " Perfect filtration system for Planted discus tank"--- that is a very lofty goal.

    Let me give you my experience-
    I have had a planted discus tank for about 1 year now. I will definately recommend starting with a CO2 set up with a PH probe to help modulate the amount of co2. My first CO2 disaster cost me 6 discus fish including a mating pair.

    For filtration I started with Fluval FX5 and it was quite good- it still is and is my favourite cannister. I added Eheim pro 3 with heater- what a waste of money- does not move around enough water and did not work well with the AM1000 Co2 reactor. In planted tank water circulation is everything. Thankfully this was in addition to Fluval so it was good enough.

    The thing that really really helped me was an automatic water changer. I had been doing 50%-70% change every week but now due to continuous water running in I am able to get my fishes to show off beautifully without any effort from my side.

    So the best filtration system is continuous flowing water. If that cannot be achieved then I would go with a sump and overflow design. The problem being they are noisy.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Quote Originally Posted by yashaswibs View Post
    " Perfect filtration system for Planted discus tank"--- that is a very lofty goal.

    Let me give you my experience-
    I have had a planted discus tank for about 1 year now. I will definately recommend starting with a CO2 set up with a PH probe to help modulate the amount of co2. My first CO2 disaster cost me 6 discus fish including a mating pair.

    For filtration I started with Fluval FX5 and it was quite good- it still is and is my favourite cannister. I added Eheim pro 3 with heater- what a waste of money- does not move around enough water and did not work well with the AM1000 Co2 reactor. In planted tank water circulation is everything. Thankfully this was in addition to Fluval so it was good enough.

    The thing that really really helped me was an automatic water changer. I had been doing 50%-70% change every week but now due to continuous water running in I am able to get my fishes to show off beautifully without any effort from my side.

    So the best filtration system is continuous flowing water. If that cannot be achieved then I would go with a sump and overflow design. The problem being they are noisy.
    Hi yashaswibs
    Thank you for "threading" and responding .
    I'm learning and absorbing all the information that I can.
    What do you mean that your "first CO2 disaster cost me 6 discus fish including a mating pair"? Can you please elaborate.
    You mention "automatic water changer". How do you have this designed to accomplish manual water changes being eliminated for continuous water running? I was under the impression that water changes need to be "drain and refill from aged & conditioned" holding tank, somewhat of a manual process.
    If you went with a "sump" have you ever had any experience with the Lifereef LF2 Side by Side? If not, which manufacturer would you recommend?
    Thanks
    Steve

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    I am suprised you asked about Lifereef overflow systems and trickle filter. I have a lifereef overflow and it works like a charm. The customer service was excellent, answered all my questions and I am convinced that this is the only system that would work for me.

    My co2 disaster- I fitted a AM1000 co2 reactor which initially managed to get extremely good co2 dissolution leading to killing off my fishes (CO2 poisoning).

    If you have well water like I do or if you have chlorine water then you can trickle in water at a slow rate and allow the overflow to take the water out continuously. Basically you will have slow flowing water all the time. No more manual labour. I am not sure I buy this aged and conditioned business especially if you are dripping the water in at a slow rate. If on the other hand you change about 90% water every week then you probably will have gas exchange which has not yet equilibrated and you will end up with stressed fishes. Under slow trickle circumstances this is not the case.

    The only place where I think this flow will not work is if you have Chloramine in your water. This does not dissipate, nor does it break down easily allowing it to accumulate. You would need a chloramine trapping device---likely chemical pre-filtration, before water is let in.

    If none of those methods works for you then you are basically stuck with a canister filter. Likely a large Eheim like 2260 or such.

    Keep the questions coming.

    You are learning and absorbing all the information--- that is a great thing to do. The problem is in information. Some are anecdotal, some that fluke some by personal experience but there are only few randomized controlled studies which prove or disprove a theory. So although you are asking the right questions you may not find all the right answers. You will need to have some basic physiology and common sense to extrapolate an answer.

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