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Thread: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

  1. #46
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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    All I can say is that Eheim 2260 has been working really well for many-many years. And 200gallon seems to be just the right size for it. I took it out from my 120gallon since I could not get the water moving slow enough... It is very powerful... But I do like the volume of the filter which allows to run it for a long time without cleaning it. As long as you have a sponge on intake tube which you clean on regular bases. Using this I am able to clean 2260 maybe once a year or every second year and I have it full of Eheim substrat . Main thing to make this work you really need to avoid dirt getting into the filter. I am using Eheim internal filter sponge around intake tube for this.

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    Registered Member West1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Great info here

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    I'm curious, I'm running a similar CO2 setup (diffuser inline that goes directly into the tank from sump) but my spray bar is at the top of the tank. Am I losing all my CO2?

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    A very old thread, but seems like where my question lies. I'm working toward a planted tank experiment. Probably no fish other than some BN for a while. Minimum 75 gal. What filtration system do folks prefer? How does that affect the substrate, if at all. My discus tanks are all bare bottom with sponge filters. I've run tanks with canisters before, but haven't in a while with my current setup. Is undergravel still done? Sumps? Point me in the right direction.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Steve, below are a few ramblings about the filters you mentioned. Before that though, are you still planning to do a shallow layer of sand with potted plants, or a full depth substrate? Large planted tanks with deep substrates have some unique "issues" (maybe "characteristics" is a better word) that need to be managed.

    Sumps are great if you can spare the $$$. Really improves aesthetics of the tank having the heater and filtration components out of sight, and the ease of mechanical filtration is a huge plus. Not great for shrimp though.

    UGF is okay, just don't overdo it on the flow. Also recommend avoid the plate style ones you see in the stores and making your own.

    For canisters, consider using layers of large pore foam like 10-20 ppi Poret instead of the traditional floss and ceramic media. I think the later makes for too much maintenance, but flexibility to experiment is part of the canister appeal.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Thanks Adam. I've got the tank with plants in cups, but I'm considering a planted substrate project. I have some swords with large roots that don't look like they would do well in pots, and some valls that that need rooting. So, thinking about what it would take. We're you recommending DIY UGF or not?

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Whatever filtration you use for other tanks will work in a planted tank too Steve . It's really no different than with any other fish tank .

    Things to consider though :

    -if you plan to.pump Co2 you'll have to avoid filters that do waterfall effect and outgass Co2 such as Hang ons , overflow sumps etc.

    -If you use nutrient rich substrate avoid water movement through them such as UGF or RUGF.

    -Plants love good water circulation so have that in mind too when choosing filters. You can compensate poor filter circulation with wave makers too .
    Last edited by Filip; 10-12-2018 at 04:24 AM.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Hi Steve, I think UGF has almost disappeared, mostly brcause it binds you to using gravel as a substrate while with plants you may want to use some sort of sand or fertile soil. No experience with HOBs. As Adam said sumps offer ease of maintenance, huge volume and great flexibility as to what you can fit into it: wet/dry trickle towers, moving bed, algae scribbers, reactors, heaters etc. Possible downside arw tank has to be drilled (usually), overflow tends not to remove much of the debris that settles on the bottom, if using CO2 it increases the dispersion of it so more goes wasted.
    I find canisters pretty effective, as Adam said you can put whatever media you prefer. I usually put some kind of sponge prefilter on the intake in the tank (easy to hide behind a plant), I put sponge and floss in the first canister tray the water goes through and biomedia in the rest. With the prefilter removing most of the bigger particles, and easy to clean during weekly wster changes, I open the filters only every 6 months or more (and still no drop in flow). If you don't like the look of the heater in the tank you can get canisters with built in heaters or in-line ones, although again it is easy to hide a heater behind a plant.
    I like canisters that hold a big volume of media and not a huge flow (so the opposite of an FX6!).
    Amongst the others I have been running for years 4 Jebao 304 (and will swap for them all my other canister filters). They are big (15.5 liter volume), quiet (after a little run in), cheap to buy and to run (20w) and so far (oldest is now 5 years) have been very reliable. They are a clone of the old Eheim Professionel II, not fancy but do the job without fuss.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    For whatever reason, aquatic plants don't seem to mind getting root bound. Huge swords can be grown in pots as small as 4".

    I think sumps are best if you can spare the time and cash, but UGFs are an okay option (you can even use one with a sump). Another downside I forgot to mention is that UGFs needs to be paired with some form of mechanical filtration. The ultimate goal is to keep the substrate free of large solids and particulates (plants can't use these, so they just pollute the substrate) and allow nutrients and O2 to diffuse down to the roots. A UGF with a couple powerheads/wave makers and a canister is an okay option, but not better than a sump with powerheads/wave makers.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    I was thinking about my set-up design ideas and realized I'd prefer to avoid the large sponge filters I have in my other tanks. I might try smaller ones, or I still have all my Fluval 405's so I might give them a try for a while. Thanks.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Heck, if you have a couple of 405s what are you waiting. If you have not used them in a while you may need to test the seals are still good, I would do it outside with a bucket on a table rather than a tank in the living room...At least spares are widely available. If all is well just change or clean the sponges in the side-trays and the media in the baskets, stick one on either end of the fishtank and Bob's your uncle!

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam S View Post
    For whatever reason, aquatic plants don't seem to mind getting root bound. Huge swords can be grown in pots as small as 4".

    I think sumps are best if you can spare the time and cash, but UGFs are an okay option (you can even use one with a sump). Another downside I forgot to mention is that UGFs needs to be paired with some form of mechanical filtration. The ultimate goal is to keep the substrate free of large solids and particulates (plants can't use these, so they just pollute the substrate) and allow nutrients and O2 to diffuse down to the roots. A UGF with a couple powerheads/wave makers and a canister is an okay option, but not better than a sump with powerheads/wave makers.
    Thanks Adam. When you say 4" pots, does that mean depth? Like a "4 in clay pot" with the tapered shape. I wish they made them getting wider toward the bottom. That's sort of my issue with containers for the plants, but maybe it's not an issue if they are deep enough.

    So, to keep the substrate free of large solids, do you still siphon, or does a part of the filtration system remove them?

    Will nutrients and O2 diffuse down to the roots on their own through what is in the water column? If the large waste was able to be removed?

  13. #58
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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Yeah, 4" clay pots are fine. I usually use the bottom ~4" of a juice container (about 4" wide too) but use clay if it has to look nice.

    Siphoning disturbs the substrate and is best avoided if possible. Ideally, the tank has enough flow to keep debris suspended for the filter, without kicking up substrate/plants or disturbing the fish. Definitely takes some tuning to balance it all out.

    Even with very fine substrates (preferred), nutrients and O2 in the water diffuse readily to the roots. Allowing waste and uneaten food to build up in the substrate is bad even with plants.

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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    OK, that's all in line with what I was thinking. I want to give more thought to the containers I use. I'm not in to having the pots be feature in the tank if I can avoid it. The plastic party cups in my current BB plant tank were a good choice for that tank.

  15. #60
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    Default Re: Filtration system for a Planted Aquarium

    Another consideration: you could do a glass planter box like Larry Waybright did in his old 125 gal. http://forum.simplydiscus.com/showth...-Nhamunda-Blue

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