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Thread: Do we still call them Cories?

  1. #1
    Registered Member gimaal's Avatar
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    Default Do we still call them Cories?

    The genus Corydoras has been revised and most of the species we Discus keepers have kept and have been found to thrive at high temps are now no longer named Corydoras.

    Corydoras had been among the most speciose genera among aquarium-kept tropicals. 231 Corydoras species had been described, 171 of which are generally recognized as valid; in addition, there are 159 C-numbers and 207 CW-numbers, most of which cannot be clearly assigned to any of the described species.

    In a brand-new revision this large number was distributed among various genera. This had been expected for a long time and largely corresponds to what fanciers all over the world think.

    Of interest to Discus fanciers, The Cory formerly known as C. sterbai is now Hoplisoma sterbai. Other heat-tolerant species have been moved to the same genus—H. melini, H. duplicareus, H. oiapoquensis, H. metae. C. amapaensis, favored by some Discus fanciers, remains in Corydoras.

    Here’s a précis of the revision, edited down from a post by Aquarium Glaser.

    In Corydoras only most of the long-snouted type remained. The following species are referred to as belonging to Corydoras in the revision: Corydoras acutus, Corydoras amapaensis, Corydoras areio, Corydoras aurofrenatus, Corydoras blochi, Corydoras caramater, Corydoras cervinus, Corydoras coriatae, Corydoras cortesi, Corydoras desana, Corydoras filamentosus, Corydoras fowleri, Corydoras fulleri, Corydoras geoffroy (type species), Corydoras maculifer, Corydoras narcissus, Corydoras negro, Corydoras ourastigma, Corydoras oxyrhynchus, Corydoras pastazensis, Corydoras saramaccensis, Corydoras sarareensis, Corydoras semiaquilus, Corydoras septentrionalis, Corydoras serratus, Corydoras simulatus, Corydoras solox, Corydoras spilurus, Corydoras stenocephalus, Corydoras treitlii, Corydoras vittatus and Corydoras zawadzkii.


    The elegans-like (including the dwarf armored catfish) were assigned to the old genus Gastrodermus. These are the species: Gastrodermus bilineatus, Gastrodermus elegans (type species), Gastrodermus gracilis, Gastrodermus guapore, Gastrodermus hastatus, Gastrodermus latus, Gastrodermus mamore, Gastrodermus nanus, Gastrodermus napoensis, Gastrodermus nijsseni, Gastrodermus paucerna, Gastrodermus pauciradiatus, Gastrodermus pygmaeus and Gastrodermus undulatus.

    The second "new" collective genus is Hoplisoma. Practically all so-called "round snouts" can be found here. These are the following species: Hoplisoma acrensis, Hoplisoma adolfoi, Hoplisoma albolineatus, Hoplisoma amphibelus, Hoplisoma apiaka, Hoplisoma araguaiaensis, Hoplisoma armatus, Hoplisoma atropersonatus, Hoplisoma axelrodi, Hoplisoma baderi, Hoplisoma benattii, Hoplisoma bicolor, Hoplisoma boehlkei, Hoplisoma boesemani, Hoplisoma bondi, Hoplisoma breei, Hoplisoma brevirostris, Hoplisoma burgessi, Hoplisoma carlae, Hoplisoma caudimaculatus, Hoplisoma cochui, Hoplisoma colossus, Hoplisoma concolor, Hoplisoma copei, Hoplisoma coppenamensis, Hoplisoma cruziensis, Hoplisoma davidsandsi, Hoplisoma diphyes, Hoplisoma duplicareus, Hoplisoma ehrhardti, Hoplisoma esperanzae, Hoplisoma evelynae, Hoplisoma eversi, Hoplisoma flaveolus, Hoplisoma froehlichi, Hoplisoma gladysae, Hoplisoma gossei, Hoplisoma granti, Hoplisoma griseus, Hoplisoma gryphus, Hoplisoma guianensis, Hoplisoma habrosus, Hoplisoma julii, Hoplisoma kanei, Hoplisoma knaacki, Hoplisoma lacrimostigmata, Hoplisoma leucomelas, Hoplisoma longipinnis, Hoplisoma loretoensis, Hoplisoma loxozonus, Hoplisoma lymnades, Hoplisoma melanistius, Hoplisoma melini, Hoplisoma metae, Hoplisoma micracanthus, Hoplisoma microcephalus, Hoplisoma multimaculatus, Hoplisoma nattereri, Hoplisoma oiapoquensis, Hoplisoma ortegai, Hoplisoma osteocarus, Hoplisoma paleatus, Hoplisoma panda, Hoplisoma paragua, Hoplisoma parallelus, Hoplisoma pavanelliae, Hoplisoma petracinii, Hoplisoma polystictus, Hoplisoma potaroensis, Hoplisoma punctatus (type species), Hoplisoma revelatus (only known in fossil form), Hoplisoma reynoldsi, Hoplisoma sanchesi, Hoplisoma schwartzi, Hoplisoma similis, Hoplisoma sipaliwini, Hoplisoma steindachneri, Hoplisoma sterbai, Hoplisoma surinamensis, Hoplisoma trilineatus, Hoplisoma tukano, Hoplisoma urucu, Hoplisoma weitzmani and Hoplisoma xinguensis.

    An old name was also reactivated for the bronze cory, Osteogaster. The following species are included in Osteogaster: Osteogaster aeneus, Osteogaster eques (type species), Osteogaster hephaestus, Osteogaster maclurei, Osteogaster melanotaenia, Osteogaster rabauti and Osteogaster zygatus.

    Aspidoras basically remains the same. The authors list these species: Aspidoras albater, Aspidoras aldebaran, Aspidoras azaghal, Aspidoras belenos, Aspidoras brunneus, Aspidoras carvalhoi, Aspidoras depinnai, Aspidoras fuscoguttatus, Aspidoras gabrieli; Aspidoras kiriri, Aspidoras lakoi, Aspidoras maculosus, Aspidoras mephisto, Aspidoras poecilus, Aspidoras psammatides, Aspidoras raimundi, Aspidoras rochai (type species) and Aspidoras velites.

    The bearded species from the south are still Scleromytax. Not much has changed here either, except that Corydoras lacerdai has now also been formally transferred to Scleromystax. In practice, this has been the case for some time. And the transfer of the former Aspidoras virgulatus to Scleromystax has also been confirmed. These are the species: Scleromystax barbatus (type species), Scleromystax lacerdai, Scleromystax macropterus, Scleromystax prionotos, Scleromystax reisi, Scleromystax salmacis and Scleromystax virgulatus.

    These species are assigned to Brochis: Brochis agassizii, Brochis amandajanea, Brochis ambiacus, Brochis approuaguensis, Brochis arcuatus, Brochis bethanae, Brochis bifasciatus, Brochis britskii, Brochis brittoi, Brochis condiscipulus, Brochis costai, Brochis crimmeni, Brochis crypticus, Brochis delphax, Brochis deweyeri, Brochis difluviatilis, Brochis ephippifer, Brochis garbei, Brochis geryi, Brochis gomezi, Brochis haraldschultzi, Brochis heteromorphus, Brochis imitator, Brochis incolicana, Brochis isbrueckeri, Brochis lamberti, Brochis leopardus, Brochis multiradiatus, Brochis noelkempffi, Brochis ornatus, Brochis orphnopterus, Brochis pantanalensis, Brochis pinheiroi, Brochis pulcher, Brochis reticulatus, Brochis robineae, Brochis robustus, Brochis seussi, Brochis sodalis, Brochis spectabilis, Brochis splendens (type species), Brochis sychri and Brochis virginiae.


    Literature:
    Dias, A.C., Tencatt, L.F.C., Roxo, F.F., Silva, G.S.C., Santos, S.A., Britto, M.R., Taylor, M.I. & Oliveira, C. (2024): Phylogenomic analyses in the complex Neotropical subfamily Corydoradinae (Siluriformes: Callichthyidae) with a new classification based on morphological and molecular data. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, zlae053, Published: 11 June 2024

    So, do we still call them Cories?

  2. #2
    Registered Member + MVP danotaylor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    Cory’s

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    Administrator and MVP Dec.2015 Second Hand Pat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    Aaron, it can be hard to change old habits.
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    Homesteader jwcarlson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    Quote Originally Posted by gimaal View Post
    So, do we still call them Cories?
    Yes.

    That's an interesting summary, I'd heard a lot of talk about how there was going to be a shakeup, but didn't realize how extensive it was going to be. Though it makes sense having listened to a couple of scientists talk about the different types of "cories".

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    Administrator AquaticNerd's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    I appreciate the summary Aaron, it was a good quick read. Regardless of what their genus changes to, I find that my habits are going to be hard to change so I'll likely continue referring to them as cories.

  6. #6
    Registered Member gimaal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    Quote Originally Posted by AquaticNerd View Post
    I appreciate the summary Aaron, it was a good quick read. Regardless of what their genus changes to, I find that my habits are going to be hard to change so I'll likely continue referring to them as cories.
    As I am sure we all will. Old habits die hard. Tetras are a good example. Back in the dawn of the hobby the popular tetras were so-called because they were all in the genus Tetragonopterus. The genus was massively revised and broken up but the popular term 'tetra' survived. The same will be true for Cories (or if you prefer, Corys) I am sure.

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    Registered Member + MVP danotaylor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    Quote Originally Posted by gimaal View Post
    (or if you prefer, Corys)
    Cheeky bloody Australian I am

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    Silver Member Iminit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    I guess it’s just me! But wow and why? Where does this new information come from? What country? Think they’d have something better to do. Some other part of the hobby they could put the time into. But hey I’m going to my pet stores and asking for Hopies now !!

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    Administrator brewmaster15's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    Quote Originally Posted by Iminit View Post
    I guess it’s just me! But wow and why? Where does this new information come from? What country? Think they’d have something better to do. Some other part of the hobby they could put the time into. But hey I’m going to my pet stores and asking for Hopies now !!
    Alot of revisions come from genetic testing that was not available when species were formally named. Back then the tools at hand not as accurate. Often times also the original description and classification was just"wrong" but it persisted.
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  10. #10
    Registered Member gimaal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Do we still call them Cories?

    To add to Al's comments, as the Aquarium Glaser article mentioned, a lot of hobbyists worldwide were expecting that the massive Corydoras genus would be broken up at some point and probably along these very lines--a genus for the long-snouted species, another for the round-snouted species, etc. The dna evidence turned out to support this. In our adult lifetimes, this has happened to Cichlasoma in cichlids, Rivulus and Aphyosemion in killies, Puntius and Barbus in barbs, among others. The ones I'm anticipating in the future, and are long overdue, are the mammoth tetra genera, Hyphessobrycon and Hemigrammus, home to some of the most popular species in our hobby.

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